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USED MACHINING CENTER FOR SALE

Explore our extensive selection of high-performance machining centers designed to elevate your precision machining operations. From vertical and horizontal models to 5-axis and multitasking centers, our range offers advanced technology, reliability, and efficiency. Discover the perfect machining center to optimize your production and stay ahead in today's competitive market.

FAQ

Unlock insights into machining centers with our FAQ. Learn about types, applications, and benefits of vertical, horizontal, and 5-axis centers. Get guidance on selecting the right machining center for your operations, operation, maintenance, and optimizing productivity for your machining needs.

A machining center is a type of machine tool used for precision machining of various materials, such as metal, plastic, or wood. It typically consists of a stationary worktable and a movable spindle that holds cutting tools, allowing for multi-axis machining operations such as milling, drilling, and tapping in a single setup. Machining centers can be vertical, horizontal, or multi-axis, offering versatility and efficiency in manufacturing processes.

Using a machining center involves several steps to set up, program, and operate the machine effectively. Here’s a general overview of how to use a machining center:

Machine Setup:

Ensure the machining center is properly installed and secured in its designated workspace.
Check that the workholding fixtures, such as vises or clamps, are securely attached to the machine’s table or pallet system.
Install cutting tools, tool holders, and tooling assemblies in the machine’s tool magazine or turret.
Workpiece Setup:

Load the workpiece onto the machine’s table or pallet system, ensuring proper alignment and secure clamping to prevent movement during machining.
Use precision measuring tools such as dial indicators or probing systems to verify the workpiece’s position and alignment relative to the machine’s coordinate system.
Tool Setup:

Select the appropriate cutting tools and tool holders based on the machining operations to be performed.
Load the selected tools into the machine’s tool magazine or turret, ensuring they are securely held and properly oriented for tool changes.
Programare:

Create or load a CNC program into the machine’s control system using CAM (Computer-Aided Manufacturing) software.
Define the machining operations, toolpaths, cutting parameters, and tool changes required to machine the workpiece according to the desired specifications.
Verify the program using simulation or dry-run modes to ensure correct toolpaths and avoid collisions with the machine or workpiece.
Machine Operation:

Start the machining center and initialize the CNC program.
Monitor the machining process, observing cutting tool performance, chip formation, and workpiece quality.
Make adjustments to cutting parameters, tool offsets, or program parameters as needed to optimize machining performance and achieve desired results.
Tool Changes:

Monitor tool wear and tool life during machining operations.
Use the machine’s automatic tool changer (ATC) or manual tool change procedures to replace worn or broken tools with new ones as required.
Workpiece Inspection:

Perform periodic inspections of the machined features and dimensions using precision measuring tools such as calipers, micrometers, or CMM (Coordinate Measuring Machine).
Compare measured dimensions to the specified tolerances to ensure workpiece accuracy and quality.
Shutdown and Maintenance:

After machining is complete, shut down the machining center and clean the machine, work area, and tooling to remove chips, coolant, and debris.
Perform routine maintenance tasks such as lubrication, tool inspection, and machine calibration to ensure optimal performance and longevity.
By following these steps and adhering to safety protocols, operators can effectively use a machining center to produce high-quality machined components with precision and efficiency.

Choosing the right machining center involves considering several factors to ensure it meets your specific machining requirements and production needs. Here are some key considerations to help you select the best machining center for your application:

Types of Machining Operations:

Identify the specific machining operations you’ll be performing, such as milling, drilling, tapping, turning, or combination machining. Choose a machining center that offers the required capabilities and flexibility to accommodate your machining needs.
Workpiece Size and Material:

Consider the size, shape, and material of the workpieces you’ll be machining. Choose a machining center with a work envelope, table size, and weight capacity that can accommodate your largest workpieces while providing sufficient clearance for tool access.
Accuracy and Precision Requirements:

Evaluate the machining center’s accuracy and precision specifications, including positional accuracy, repeatability, and surface finish capabilities. Select a machine with tight tolerances and advanced features such as linear scales, thermal compensation, and high-resolution encoders for precise machining results.
Spindle Speed and Power:

Assess the spindle speed range, horsepower, and torque capabilities of the machining center’s spindle. Ensure the machine can provide the required cutting speeds and power levels for your machining operations, including both roughing and finishing processes.
Tooling and Tool Magazine:

Consider the tooling options and tool magazine capacity offered by the machining center. Choose a machine with a sufficient number of tool positions and tool change capabilities to accommodate your tooling requirements and minimize downtime for tool changes.
Control System and Software Compatibility:

Evaluate the machining center’s control system and software compatibility with your existing CAD/CAM (Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Aided Manufacturing) software and programming preferences. Choose a machine with user-friendly controls, advanced features, and programming capabilities that streamline setup, operation, and programming tasks.
Automation and Integration:

Determine if you require automation features such as pallet changers, tool changers, or robotic loading/unloading systems to enhance productivity and efficiency. Choose a machining center with built-in automation options or compatibility with external automation solutions for seamless integration into your production environment.
Support and Service:

Research the manufacturer’s reputation for customer support, service availability, and aftermarket support. Choose a reputable manufacturer with a strong track record of reliability, responsive technical support, and readily available spare parts to minimize downtime and ensure long-term reliability.
Budget and Cost of Ownership:

Establish a budget for purchasing and operating the machining center, taking into account initial purchase price, installation costs, tooling expenses, maintenance requirements, and energy consumption. Consider the total cost of ownership (TCO) over the machine’s lifespan to make an informed decision.
By carefully evaluating these factors and selecting a machining center that aligns with your specific machining requirements, production goals, and budget constraints, you can invest in a machine that enhances your manufacturing capabilities and delivers a strong return on investment.

A machining center works by integrating multiple machining processes, such as milling, drilling, tapping, and turning, into a single machine tool platform. Here’s how a machining center operates:

Workpiece Setup: The workpiece is securely mounted on the machining center’s table or pallet system using workholding fixtures such as vises, clamps, or chuck jaws. Proper alignment and clamping ensure the workpiece remains stable during machining.

Tool Setup: Cutting tools, such as end mills, drills, taps, and turning tools, are loaded into the machining center’s tool magazine or tool changer. The machine may have multiple tool stations to accommodate various tools for different machining operations.

Program Setup: A CNC (Computer Numerical Control) program is created or loaded into the machining center’s control system using CAM (Computer-Aided Manufacturing) software. The program defines the sequence of machining operations, toolpaths, cutting parameters, and tool changes required to machine the workpiece according to the desired specifications.

Execution of Machining Operations:

Milling: The spindle rotates at high speeds, and the cutting tool removes material from the workpiece by rotating, plunging, or traversing along different axes. Milling operations can include facing, contouring, pocketing, and slotting.
Drilling and Tapping: The spindle rotates at lower speeds, and the cutting tool drills holes or taps threads into the workpiece. Drilling and tapping operations can be performed at various depths and hole diameters.
Turning (Optional): In a multitasking machining center, the spindle can be equipped with turning tools to perform turning operations such as cylindrical turning, facing, grooving, and threading.
Tool Changes: As the machining program progresses, the machine automatically selects and changes tools from the tool magazine or tool changer as needed to perform different machining operations.
Coolant and Chip Removal: Coolant is applied to the cutting area to lubricate the cutting tools, dissipate heat, and flush away chips and debris generated during machining. Chip conveyors or chip trays collect the chips for disposal or recycling.

Workpiece Inspection: Periodic inspections of the machined features and dimensions are performed using precision measuring tools such as calipers, micrometers, or CMM (Coordinate Measuring Machine). Measurements are compared to specified tolerances to ensure workpiece accuracy and quality.

Completion and Unloading: Once machining is complete, the finished workpiece is unloaded from the machining center’s table or pallet system. Secondary operations such as deburring, polishing, or assembly may be performed before the workpiece is ready for use or further processing.

By integrating multiple machining processes into a single machine tool platform, machining centers offer versatility, efficiency, and precision for a wide range of manufacturing applications in industries such as aerospace, automotive, medical, and mold making.

There are numerous reputable brands that manufacture machining centers, each offering a range of models with various configurations and capabilities. Some well-known machining center brands include:

Haas Automation: Haas is a leading manufacturer of CNC machine tools, including vertical and horizontal machining centers. They offer a wide range of machining centers known for their reliability, affordability, and user-friendly controls.

Mazak Corporation: Mazak is a global leader in the manufacturing of CNC machine tools, offering a diverse lineup of vertical, horizontal, and multi-tasking machining centers. Their machines are known for their precision, versatility, and advanced technology.

DMG MORI: DMG MORI is a prominent manufacturer of CNC machine tools and automation solutions, including vertical and horizontal machining centers. Their machining centers are renowned for their quality, performance, and innovative features.

Okuma Corporation: Okuma specializes in the production of CNC machine tools, including vertical and horizontal machining centers, with a focus on precision, reliability, and advanced technology. Their machines are used in various industries for high-performance machining applications.

Doosan Machine Tools: Doosan offers a wide range of vertical and horizontal machining centers known for their robust construction, high-speed machining capabilities, and user-friendly controls. Their machines are designed for precision and productivity in demanding machining environments.

Hurco Companies, Inc.: Hurco manufactures vertical machining centers with a focus on advanced CNC technology, user-friendly programming, and high-speed machining capabilities. Their machines are known for their reliability and versatility in various manufacturing applications.

Fanuc Corporation: Fanuc produces a range of vertical and horizontal machining centers equipped with their advanced CNC systems and automation solutions. Their machines are designed for high-speed, high-precision machining in industries such as aerospace, automotive, and medical.

Hardinge Inc.: Hardinge offers vertical and horizontal machining centers known for their precision, durability, and versatility. Their machines are used in various industries for precision machining applications requiring tight tolerances and complex geometries.

Haas Automation: Haas is a well-known manufacturer of CNC machine tools, including vertical and horizontal machining centers. They offer a wide range of machining centers known for their reliability, affordability, and user-friendly controls.

Yamazaki Mazak Corporation: Yamazaki Mazak is a global leader in the manufacturing of CNC machine tools, offering a diverse lineup of vertical, horizontal, and multi-tasking machining centers. Their machines are known for their precision, versatility, and advanced technology.

These are just a few examples of the many reputable machining center brands available in the market. When choosing a machining center, it’s essential to consider factors such as machine specifications, features, reliability, and after-sales support provided by the manufacturer or distributor.

The cost of a machining center can vary significantly depending on several factors, including the brand, model, size, configuration, features, and options included with the machine. Generally, machining centers range in price from tens of thousands to several million dollars. Here’s a rough breakdown of price ranges based on machine type:

Vertical Machining Centers (VMC):

Entry-level or benchtop VMCs: $20,000 to $100,000
Mid-range VMCs: $100,000 to $500,000
High-end or multi-axis VMCs: $500,000 to $1,000,000+
Horizontal Machining Centers (HMC):

Entry-level or compact HMCs: $50,000 to $200,000
Mid-range HMCs: $200,000 to $1,000,000
High-end or multi-pallet HMCs: $1,000,000 to $3,000,000+
5-Axis Machining Centers:

Entry-level or compact 5-axis machining centers: $100,000 to $500,000
Mid-range 5-axis machining centers: $500,000 to $1,500,000
High-end or multi-pallet 5-axis machining centers: $1,500,000 to $5,000,000+
It’s important to note that the prices mentioned above are approximate and can vary based on factors such as machine size, spindle configuration, tool magazine capacity, automation options, and additional accessories. Additionally, costs associated with installation, training, tooling, maintenance, and ongoing operational expenses should also be considered when budgeting for a machining center.

When purchasing a machining center, it’s advisable to request quotes from multiple suppliers, compare specifications and features, and consider factors such as machine reliability, service and support, and long-term return on investment (ROI) to make an informed decision that aligns with your machining needs and budget constraints.

Machining centers offer several advantages, including increased productivity, reduced setup times, higher accuracy and precision, improved part quality, versatility for performing various machining operations, and the ability to automate processes for greater efficiency.

Machining centers offer greater versatility, accuracy, and productivity compared to traditional machine tools. They can perform multiple machining operations in a single setup, often with automated tool changes and part handling, resulting in faster cycle times and improved efficiency.

Common challenges with machining centers include tool wear and breakage, programming errors, workpiece material selection and fixturing issues, toolpath optimization, coolant management, and maintaining tight tolerances and surface finish requirements.

Lathes are used for a variety of machining operations, including turning, facing, drilling, boring, threading, and tapering cylindrical workpieces. They are commonly used in manufacturing industries for producing components such as shafts, bolts, screws, and fittings.